One of my Favorite Tools

As a landlord, I actually try to limit the number of tools that I own.  My belief is that the more tools you have, the more work you end up doing.  To this end, I also drive a Toyota Matrix station wagon, not a pickup truck.

Anyway, I do have a few favorite tools that don’t fit in the tool bag.  Today it was my drain snake.  Ten years ago, I don’t think I had any idea what a drain snake was and now I know I own at least two and maybe a third hiding in maintenance room somewhere.  It is a simple, hand-held device that allows you to run a long, thick metal spring into a drain and spin it around to clear a blockage.

In my experience, a drain snake is most effective on bathroom sinks and bathtubs.  You do have to disconnect the P-Trap (or J bend), but usually you can save yourself about $75-100, if you are willing to get a little dirty.  Make sure if you are going to use a snake, that no one has poured Draino down the sink recently.  Then messy becomes toxic.

As you incrementally push the snake further into the drain line while rotating it, you usually can feel when you hit the clog.  Also, when you pull the snake back out, you usually will find a clump of something wrapped around the tip (most of the time, hair, sometimes a dead bird).  For really clogged drains, I usually snake it a few times.

Here’s what I have learned in my seven years of snaking:

  • Bring gloves, channel locks, a roll of paper towels, a garbage bag, and  a bucket
  • The channel locks are to take apart the P-trap and the bucket goes underneath to catch the water (directly underneath while you are taking the drain line apart)
  • As you are pulling the snake back out, hold a clump of paper towels in your hand and run the snake through it to clean off the gunk. If you are really diligent, you will also spray it with WD-40 to inhibit rust.
  • Kitchen sinks are often better left to the professionals.  Handheld snakes just seem to be a little too small to solve the problem.

And of course, if you want to accessorize your drain snake, you simply must add a toilet auger and a Zip It.  The toilet auger is a little less fun to use since you are dealing with someone else’s waste, usually solid, but again, it can save you $100 if you don’t have to call the drain service (try $300 on Christmas Eve.  Bad call on my part!) It follows the same principles as the snake, although I seem to manage to break every auger I buy.  The Zip It is a cheap plastic strip that slides into the drain and grabs any hair that is close to the opening.  It is perfect for anyone with long hair and drains without good screens. I also use it when turning units over as preventative maintenance.

Finally, always be sure to show your tenants what you pulled out of their sink and tub drains (not so much on the toilet).  It can help prevent repeat performances in the future.

Happy drain snaking!

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