Accountability Theory

Over the years, I have seen that people actually appreciate being held accountable.  It shows you respect them enough to give them a chance.  Holding someone accountable is very different from establishing rules.  I believe that setting expectations is a sign of respect, whereas making rules starts from the belief that people are going to fail.

Of course, there will be plenty of rules at your properties, both your own and those required by the landlord/tenant laws in your state. What I am talking about are situations involving a specific tenant, usually around rent payments or disruptive behavior. When an issue arises, the first step is to communicate directly with the tenant. It is important that you are in a calm and controlled place emotionally before you start this interaction. So give yourself time to blow off steam and release any frustrations you may have about the situation.

There is a saying, I think written by T. Harv Eker in Secrets of a Millionaire Mind and it is this: “You can be right or you can be rich, but not both.”  I remind myself of this when I am in a heated situation with a tenant.  I always try to stay focused on my desired result (i.e. rent payment, prompt move out, the end of disruptive behavior) and adjust my behavior in such a way to maximize the chances of achieving that outcome.

Once you are having a conversation with the tenant, it is important to clearly establish what you want them to do and when you want them to do it.  Most tenant issues follow this pattern.  You want them to pay their rent by a certain date or move out by a certain time or turn down their music after a certain hour. If there is any confusion about your expectations, put them in writing and give a copy to the tenant.  If it is a chronic issue, that written statement should be an official notice (i.e. a 3 Day Pay or Vacate or 10 Day Comply or Vacate).  For a tenant who is behind on their rent, you might just write up a simple letter that they sign, with the understanding that if they do not comply, they will be served with an official notice.

Once your expectation is clear with the tenant, it is your job to follow up if they are not being accountable to their agreement.  It is so easy to let this critical piece slip through the cracks, especially if you are frustrated with the tenant.  Don’t let that happen! Write a note in your calendar to remind yourself to follow up. I am often writing myself notes like “Joe, pay $300” or “Check with neighbors at lofts about noise” on specific days in my planner.  It is important for the tenant to know that you take your agreement seriously.  If you don’t follow up with them, they will know that they can continue to get away with whatever they were doing.  A simple phone call or text message is often all it takes to keep them on track.

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About Learn to Be a Landlord
I currently am a real estate investor in Spokane, WA. I own and manage 79 rental units. My background is not in business, but in social services and community organizing. I also had way too much liberal arts education. Somehow that all fits together to make me a landlord!

One Response to Accountability Theory

  1. quickpatch says:

    Jessica, thank you for the great blogs. I really appreciate the quote about being right or rich, but not both. I am going to put that on my calendar for two weeks, so it is burned into my memory. It will help me keep my best interest in mind when I am under stress.

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