Drama Detector

I have found that how a person behaves in the process of looking for an apartment usually mirrors how they will behave as a tenant. Sure, we all have bad days when we get stuck in traffic or get lost on the way to somewhere new.  I am not talking about those types of issues (besides, the good potential tenants will call you and let you know what is going on!).  I am referring to the person who calls to set up an appointment and then cancels and then calls again and then cancels.  Or when two members of the same couple call and don’t realize the other person has already talked to me.  Or my personal favorite is when some spends ten minutes on the phone with me asking me every conceivable question about the unit and then announces that their income is $700/month and the rent is $650.

Don’t ever work harder than a perspective tenant. Once I do a thorough job showing an apartment and explaining the application process, the ball is in the tenant’s court.  I never call a potential tenant back at that point.  It is their job to show up with a completed application and the screening fee.  If they don’t, I just move on to the next person. I have had people call and explain how they will need a letter from me or a form filled out so they can access a down payment assistance program and I say “I will be happy to do that for you once your application is accepted.”

I have had several occasions when someone shows up to look at an apartment and they spend a long time with me and seem very interested and then they even come back and look again with friends.  And they call me every twenty minutes asking a new question each time.  Then they text me and tell me they are going to bring their application in tomorrow.  And then I never hear from them again.

Filling a vacancy is all about non-attachment.  Do your job.  Be professional, courteous and friendly. Ask the potential tenant lots of relevant questions.  Explain how your business works.  And then let it go.  I know you need to fill that unit as soon as possible, but the harder you push; the more likely you are going to end up with a problem tenant on your hands.

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About Learn to Be a Landlord
I currently am a real estate investor in Spokane, WA. I own and manage 79 rental units. My background is not in business, but in social services and community organizing. I also had way too much liberal arts education. Somehow that all fits together to make me a landlord!

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